Mideastro

The Dish

Must-Try

Comments

Must-Try: the delectable and not-too-sweet fig kataiv at Mideastro Yorkville

Mideastro-Yorkville

Mideastro Yorkville’s fig kataiv (Image: Renée Suen)

The delicious possibilities of melding two adjacent cuisines—Mediterranean and Middle Eastern—are rarely as apparent as they are in the fig kataiv at two-year-old Mideastro Yorkville. Executive chef Benny Cohen sandwiches a fluffy layer of spiced mascarpone and aromatic fresh poached figs between crisp and wiry kataifi discs. The clarified butter-brushed phyllo pastry is baked in a cast iron skillet for seven minutes, and is then showered with pistachio brittle and cinnamon-laced fig syrup, cloves and nutmeg. It’s a modern interpretation of the kanafehthe traditional Levantine dessert of soft, syrup-soaked goat cheese—and tastes like the exotic love child of a warm cheesecake and a fig newton. $11.

Mideastro Yorkville, 27 Yorkville Ave., 416-477-2427, mideastroyorkville.com

The Dish

Drinks

4 Comments

Bruce Wallner wins top prize at Ontario sommelier competition

(Image: Shannon Hamilton)

Toronto master sommelier Bruce Wallner (Paese, Mideastro) took first place at the Best Ontario Sommelier Competition at The Fifth Grill and Terrace on Sunday. Wallner beat out 15 other wine experts in the competition, which consisted of a written theory test and a blind tasting in front of a live audience. Waller will now go on and represent Ontario at the national competition in Halifax on September 17 and 18, where he’ll be competing alongside Will Predhomme of Canoe, who won the 2010 competition. Apart from the “Best Ontario Sommelier” title, Wallner also walked away with trips to Germany, Napa and Argentina. We hear they’ve got some pretty decent wine there.

The Dish

Restaurants

1 Comment

Where to Eat Now 2012

Where to Eat Now 2012

The sprawling dining scene in Toronto is more diverse and promising than ever. This year, a handful of 20-something chefs who trained at the city’s old-guard establishments broke out on their own with original, low-rent restaurants in Roncesvalles, Bloorcourt Village and Cabbagetown. New Italian places—some quaint and friendly, others opulent and expensive—outpaced bistros by an angel hair. Canada’s heritage was thoroughly and pervasively plumbed for culinary inspiration. (Is there anything that can’t be glazed in maple syrup?) The barbecue craze progressed into a New Age southern food fetish that involves a lot of top-shelf bourbon, house-made pickles and artisanal sauces. Chefs evoked the Mediterranean on seafood-loaded menus downtown, where, after years of casual comforts, fine dining returned, albeit revamped for diners who couldn’t care less about gourmet bravado and epicurean elitism, so long as their trout is perfectly seared (and comes from Lake Huron). Toronto Life’s critics indulged in it all. We ate, drank, debated and finally ranked the 10 spots that surprised us, delighted us and made us grateful to live in this restaurant-obsessed city.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Dish

Restaurants

4 Comments

Best New Restaurants 2012: No. 10 Mideastro

Best New Restaurants 2012: 10 Mideastro

Read the rest of this entry »

The Dish

Restaurants

6 Comments

Best New Restaurants 2012

Best New Restaurants 2012

Ten spots that surprised us, delighted us and made us grateful to live in this restaurant-obsessed city.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Dish

Restaurants

2 Comments

Weekly Lunch Pick: an escape from winter at Yorkville’s Mideastro

The seafood couscous at Mideastro (Image: Renée Suen)

With Toronto’s wet, sloppy winter weather setting in, it’s nice to be reminded of warmer climes. The five-month-old Yorkville location of Mideastro does just that with its sophisticated take on Mediterranean and Israeli cuisine. It’s a particularly good bet at lunchtime, when smaller versions of many favourites from the dinner menu are available at a fraction of the cost.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Dish

People

Comments

David Adjey cooks up a series that will save new dining spots from disaster

David Adjey: An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure

David Adjey: An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure

David Adjey, the beaming and bronzed saviour-chef of Restaurant Makeover, goes back to basics on his new Food Network series Restaurant 101. The seasoned entrepreneur (formerly of Nectar, now head of his own consulting firm) will play guidance counsellor to troubled upstarts that can’t get their doors open for business. The chosen spots are located throughout Canada and the U.S., with about three in the GTA. One episode has already been shot at a Thornhill Italian–Middle Eastern fusion eatery called Mideastro, where a partner pulled out at the last minute. When we ask what’s in his bag of tricks this time, he responds, “I have been making mistakes in the industry for 27 years.” Enough said.

Read the rest of this entry »