Christopher Brown

The Dish

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Terroir 2012 recap: what we saw, heard and ate at the big annual food industry meet-up

Kevin Gilmour (sous chef at The Drake Hotel) was assisted by his crew at this pork carving station. Hunks of roasted pork were served over a peanut-ginger slaw (Image: Renée Suen)

Last week, 500 members or so of Canada’s food and hospitality industry gathered for Terroir VI at the newly renovated Arcadian Court. The theme for this year’s symposium was “The New Radicals,” a new generation of chefs that have a collaborative and unconventional approach to cuisine despite their conventional training. Symposium chair Arlene Stein had arranged a line up of the industry’s finest from Canada and abroad, assembled on panels featuring restaurateurs, writers and chefs from the old and new vanguard—most attendees agreed this year’s crop was the best yet (before the event we spoke to Australian chef Ben Shewry, as well as sustainable aquaculture champion Barton Seaver and natural wine advocate Alice Feiring.).

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The Dish

Random Stuff

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Perigee, the final review

For six years, Perigee has been one of the city’s best fine-dining restaurants. Sadly, it is the latest casualty of the recession: Victor Brown and his two sons, Christopher and Michael (owners and chefs), served their last dishes and closed their doors on April 11. We had sent a reviewer a week prior. Here is the review—a testament to the high quality of the food, right until the end.

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The Dish

Random Stuff

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Perigee’s canapé giveaway, LCBO wine sale, DIY nose-to-tail

The ubiquitous—and heretofore unrecyclable—coffee cup (Photo by Martin Cathrae)

The ubiquitous—and heretofore unrecyclable—coffee cup (Photo by Martin Cathrae)

• Dinner for two at Perigee runs about $210, so this is the last restaurant we expected to be offering giveaways. Yesterday morning, however, executive chef Christopher Brown hit Union Station with 500 promotional canapés in an attempt to get business flowing. [Toronto Star]

• Toronto’s goal of diverting 70 per cent of its waste from landfills by 2010 makes every piece of waste a target. Back in the crosshairs of city officials is the ubiquitous—and heretofore unrecyclable—coffee cup. [Globe & Mail]

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