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Jonathan Castellino’s photos make familiar Toronto landscapes weird again

Jonathan Castellino: Interference Patterns

(Image: Jonathan Castellino)

Jonathan Castellino’s photo series, Interference Patterns, is named after a natural phenomenon that happens when two waves of similar frequency overlap, creating a new oscillation. Over the past two years, Castellino, best known for his architectural photo blog, Sacramental Perception, has been creating intricate images by layering different photos on top of one another and then combining the resulting jumble into a single frame. The finished photographs are jarringly complex, with familiar Toronto landmarks (the CN Tower, the greenery of the Don Valley ravine) getting lost in surreal new surroundings. We spoke with Castellino about his work. Click through the image gallery to read what he said.

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Camp out on the Islands, see some buskers and seven other things to do this week

Toronto things to do, August 2015

(Images, clockwise from top left: Jane Levy in Bang Bang Baby, courtesy of Red Eye Media; Sketchbook Project pop-up, courtesy of the Sketchbook Project; Silver and the Sauruses, courtesy of Buskerfest Toronto; the Weather Station, courtesy of Wavelength Toronto)

Attend an indie-rock campout on the Islands
For five years, Toronto’s friendliest music fest, ALL CAPS!, offered listeners of all ages an idyllic island retreat and intimate shoreside sets from the country’s finest indie bands. Now, ALL CAPS! organizers Wavelength are resurrecting that festival’s rustic-getaway vibe—overnight camping included—with Camp Wavelength, a Canada-centric lineup featuring Toronto roots rockers the Wooden Sky, singer-songwriter the Weather Station and dubby psych-pop trio Doomsquad. Friday, August 28 to Sunday, August 30. $75; $150 with camping access. Artscape Gibraltar Point, 433 Lakeshore Ave., Toronto Islands, 416-546-2745, wavelengthtoronto.com.

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Scream for One Direction, gorge on fried food at the CNE and eight other things to do this week

What to do in Toronto this week: August 2015, 17–23

(Images, clockwise from top left: the CNE, courtesy of the CNE; Art Spin, courtesy of Art Spin; Sail-In Cinema, courtesy of Ports Toronto; One Direction, courtesy of Sony)

Watch Ghostbusters from the prow of your yacht
Walk down any Toronto block this summer and you’re bound to bump into a free outdoor screening series. But Sail-In Cinema trumps them all. Featuring the world’s first floating two-sided screen, the three-night film fest welcomes both landlubbers, who congregate on the shore, and sailors, who watch from anchored boats. The ’80s lineup includes E.T., Ghostbusters and The Goonies. Thursday, August 20 to Saturday, August 22. FREE. Sugar Beach, 25 Dockside Dr., sailincinema.com.

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Regent Park’s newest piece of public art has stories to tell

Dan Bergeron's Faces of Regent Park

(Images: Dan Bergeron)

Outside the Daniels Spectrum in Regent Park, a series of electric-hued portraits are painted on nine-foot slabs of laminated glass. In one, a young girl with missing teeth flashes a grin. In another, an Asian octogenarian’s face is splashed with colourful splotches and chevron stripes. And in another, a woman is rendered with a third eye. They’re just three of the dozen faces that make up visual artist Dan Bergeron’s latest installation, Faces of Regent Park, which was completed in spring. The portraits are part of the neighbourhood’s ongoing revitalization—the area’s biggest overhaul since it was originally built as a housing project in the 1940s and 1950s.

Bergeron is best known for his earlier series of giant Regent Park portraits, a temporary installation that he completed in 2008 as part of the Luminato Festival. His new set is meant to be a permanent neighbourhood fixture. Bergeron began by photographing around 45 subjects, then narrowed the roster down to a dozen faces that he felt best represented the area’s diversity. He painted over the black and white photographs with swaths of colours, graffiti scrawls and patterns. “I wanted to use high-contrast hues because where the pieces are located in the plaza, the concrete is grey and the buildings are dark,” he says. “I really wanted to make these bright pieces as a juxtaposition to the surroundings.” We spoke with him about the story behind each piece. Click through the photo gallery to read what he said.

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See Austra for free, party with Die Antwoord and eight other things to do this week

Best Bets for August 10–16: Austra, Lemon Bucket Orkestra, and Miguel

(Images, clockwise from top left: still from Dial M For Murder, courtesy of Photofest; Austra singer Katie Stelmanis, by Norman Wong; Counting Sheep, by Carlos M. Garete, courtesy of SummerWorks; Miguel, by Daniel Sannwald, courtesy of RCA)

Listen to Miguel’s soaring falsetto at the Sound Academy
Sultry, sexed-up R&B is back in vogue, courtesy of artists like the dreadlocked Toronto superstar The Weeknd and the slinky American singer Frank Ocean. The other big name on the scene: Miguel, the dreamboat crooner who crept into the mainstream three years ago with his lusty lyrics, woozy production values and Prince-worthy falsetto. He plays the Sound Academy this week in support of his languid new album, Wildheart. Tuesday, August 11. $39.50. Sound Academy, 11 Polson Pier, ticketmaster.ca.

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See The Roots play for free, watch Eugenie Bouchard hit the ball and eight other things to do this week

(Images, clockwise from top left: The Roots, courtesy of Panamania; Janelle Monáe, courtesy of Panamania; Paris Rooftops by Michael Wolf, courtesy of Bau-Xi Photo; Eugenie Bouchard, courtesy of Tennis Canada)

(Images, clockwise from top left: The Roots, courtesy of Panamania; Janelle Monáe, courtesy of Panamania; Paris Rooftops by Michael Wolf, courtesy of Bau-Xi Photo; Eugenie Bouchard, courtesy of Tennis Canada)

See a loopy surrealist interactive play in a church courtyard
An Evening in July, produced for SummerWorks by the Toronto sketch comedy troupe Templeton Philharmonic, invites audiences into an otherworldly summer celebration inspired by Marie Hélène de Rothschild’s notorious Surrealist Ball of 1972. As the evening progresses, the party’s sisterly co-hosts descend into a comically melodramatic feud that ends in a devastating climax. Thursday, August 6 to Sunday, August 16. $15; festival passes from $40. St. George the Martyr Anglican Church, 205 John St., 416-504-9971, summerworks.ca.

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See Kanye at the Pan Am closing ceremonies, go to the WayHome festival and eight other things to do this week

(Images, clockwise from top left: Betroffenheit, courtesy of Panamania; Kanye West, courtesy of the Pan Am Games; Cirque Alfonse, by Luce Tremblay-Gaudette; Night It Up, courtesy of Night It Up)

(Images, clockwise from top left: Betroffenheit, courtesy of Panamania; Kanye West, courtesy of the Pan Am Games; Cirque Alfonse, by Luce Tremblay-Gaudette; Night It Up, courtesy of Night It Up)

Watch the Pan Am Games’ controversial closing ceremony
Despite a petition protesting his performance, Kanye West will close out the Pan Am Games. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing: whatever your thoughts on Yeezus, he puts on an incredible show. He’ll be joined onstage by Floridian novelty rapper Pitbull, Canadian folk-rocker Serena Ryder, and a dazzling complement of dancers and confetti. Sunday, July 26. $50–$205. Rogers Centre, 1 Blue Jays Way, ticketmaster.ca.

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Ride a giant waterslide, see the Flaming Lips for free and eight other things to do this week

(Images, clockwise from top left: The Flaming Lips, by George Salisbury; David Rakoff, by Paul Roossin; Slide the City by Michael Miller/Flickr; Interpol, courtesy of Shore Fire Media)

(Images, clockwise from top left: The Flaming Lips, by George Salisbury; David Rakoff, by Paul Roossin; Slide the City by Michael Miller/Flickr; Interpol, courtesy of Shore Fire Media)

Watch Downsview Park transform into a giant waterslide
Slide the City has turned nearly 200 major city streets across North America into massive, 1,000-foot-long slip ’n’ slides, but in Toronto, it will take place on the sloping hills of Downsview Park. Whether you’re a kid or just a kid at heart, grab an inflatable tube and get ready for nearly three football fields’ worth of slippery bliss. Saturday, July 18 and Sunday, July 19. $20–$60. Downsview Park, 35 Carl Hall Rd., 416-952-2222, slidethecity.com.

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A Foo Fighters concert, Shakespeare in High Park and seven other things to do this week

(Images, clockwise from top left: Foo Fighters, by Hayley Madden; 100 SUNS: 057 Baker/21 Kilotons/Bikini Atoll/1946, by Michael Light, courtesy of the Art Gallery of Ontario; A Tribe Called Red, by Falling Tree; Night Tropics by Caroline Larsen)

(Images, clockwise from top left: Foo Fighters, by Hayley Madden; 100 SUNS: 057 Baker/21 Kilotons/Bikini Atoll/1946, by Michael Light, courtesy of the Art Gallery of Ontario; A Tribe Called Red, by Falling Tree; Night Tropics by Caroline Larsen)

Hang out with a troupe of dancing newsboys
Based on a real-life 19th-century newsboy strike, Disney’s blockbuster musical Newsies follows a group of vagrant kids who sell copies of the New York World to survive in the city. When the rag’s greedy publisher slashes the newsies’ measly wages, they go on strike and eventually publish a paper of their own. The show features a triumphantly brassy score co-written by Alan Menken (of Beauty and the Beast and Little Mermaid fame). Wednesday, July 8 to Aug. 30. $35–$130. Ed Mirvish Theatre, 244 Victoria St., 416-872-1212, mirvish.com.

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The Gilded Stage: David Leventi’s photos of the world’s most opulent opera houses

David Leventi photographs of opulent opera houses

(Images: courtesy of Bau-Xi Gallery)

When David Leventi was a kid, his grandfather, a Romanian cantor named Anton Gutman, would sing arias in the family’s Westchester house, swanning around the living room like it was the stage at La Scala. Gutman’s aspirations for operatic glory had been stymied in World War II, when he landed in a Russian POW camp, forced to perform for Red Army officers.

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Show your Pride, listen to some jazz and eight other things to do this week

(Images, clockwise from top left: the Pride parade, courtesy of Pride Toronto; a still from Fiddler on the Roof, courtesy of Park Circus; Malpaso Dance Company; St. Vincent, by Renata Raksha)

(Images, clockwise from top left: the Pride parade, courtesy of Pride Toronto; a still from Fiddler on the Roof, courtesy of Park Circus; Malpaso Dance Company; St. Vincent, by Renata Raksha)

Listen to Spoon’s cultish indie rock
Ask any music nerd to name the most consistent indie band of the past two decades, and there’s a good chance you’ll hear about Spoon. The Austin outfit never shot into the mainstream, but each of its eight albums has been a quiet triumph, filled with creative production tricks and catchy choruses. Last year’s They Want My Soul was no exception—it’s a lovely late-game addition to an already exemplary track record. Tuesday, June 23 and Wednesday, June 24. $26. Phoenix Concert Theatre, 410 Sherbourne St., 416-323-1251, collectiveconcerts.com.

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Reasons to Love Toronto Now: because the city is our canvas

(Images: Erin Leydon)

(Images: Erin Leydon)

Four years ago, Rob Ford and his heavies were power-washing graffiti (both artful and vandalistic) wherever they could find it. In the po-Fo era, city hall is actively embracing the stuff, commissioning dozens of underpass murals and alley paintings. This new graffiti gusto has unleashed a torrent of creativity among Toronto street artists, who are beautifying the city’s surfaces with cheeky, radiant works. Here, a tour of our 10 favourites.

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Chill with Drake, stuff yourself for a good cause and eight other things to do this week

(Images, clockwise from top left: still from When Marnie Was There, courtesy of TIFF; Lana Del Rey, by Neil Krug; artists of the National Ballet in Piano Concerto #1, by Aleksandar Antonijevic; cheese at Toronto Taste, courtesy of Second Harvest)

(Images, clockwise from top left: still from When Marnie Was There, courtesy of TIFF; Lana Del Rey, by Neil Krug; artists of the National Ballet in Piano Concerto #1, by Aleksandar Antonijevic; cheese at Toronto Taste, courtesy of Second Harvest)

Get seduced by Lana Del Rey
In the summer of 2011, Lana Del Rey broke the Internet with the sultry, cinematic ballad “Video Games.” A few months later, a disastrous Saturday Night Live performance threatened to kill the hype before her major label debut album, Born to Die, was even released. The moody singer persevered: last year’s sublime Ultraviolence was an international chart-topper. This week, she shares the stage with Montreal avant-pop artist Grimes. Wednesday, June 3. $29–$83. Molson Amphitheatre, 909 Lake Shore Blvd. W., 1-855-985-5000, ticketmaster.ca.

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See a guitar master, go to an indie-pop festival and six other things to do this week

(Images, clockwise from top left: Constantines, courtesy of Sub Pop Records; Yo Yo Ma, by Stephen Danelian; Etiquette, courtesy of Hand Drawn Dracula Records; Crystal Castles)

(Images, clockwise from top left: Constantines, courtesy of Sub Pop Records; Yo-Yo Ma, by Stephen Danelian; Etiquette, courtesy of Hand Drawn Dracula Records; Crystal Castles)

Watch one of Toronto’s greatest rock bands in the room they were born to play
They may be products of the late-’90s southern Ontario hardcore scene, but the Constantines have never been shy about their populist ambitions. Over the course of four albums, they’ve channeled punk fury and blue-collar romanticism into rousing indie-rock anthems that have made a profound impact on famous fans, including Feist and Arcade Fire. After a four-year hiatus, the band reunited last year to play select festival dates. This week, they achieve true CanRock sainthood with their first headlining show at Massey Hall. Calgary art-pop eccentric Chad VanGaalen opens. Wednesday May 27. $18.94. 178 Victoria St., 416-872-4255, masseyhall.com.

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Go to a massive beach party, explore forbidden buildings and six other things to do this week

(Images, clockwise from top left: Tame Impala; painting by Johnathan Ball, courtesy of Liss Gallery; Burning Star, by Alex Brenner; Diana Krall)

(Images, clockwise from top left: Tame Impala; painting by Johnathan Ball, courtesy of Liss Gallery; Burning Star, by Alex Brenner; Diana Krall)

Get a sneak preview of the album of the summer
It’s been almost three years since Aussie psychedelicists Tame Impala released their sophomore stunner, Lonerism, but it feels like they never really went away. Lead single “Elephant” stomped its way through episodes of Girls and The Vampire Diaries—not to mention an inescapable Blackberry commercial—and we’re willing to bet Indie 88 is playing the album’s swooning centerpiece track, “Feel Like We Only Go Backwards,” yet again as you read this. As such, Tame Impala’s upcoming third album, Currents (out July 17), is one of the most hotly anticipated rock albums of 2015. And while early evidence suggests the band has retired its formative guitar roar for synth-washed electro-R&B, the signature trippiness remains. Fortunately, Massey Hall has the cavernous backdrop to accommodate one hell of a light show. Tuesday, May 19. $39.50-$59.50. 178 Victoria St., 416-872-4255, masseyhall.com

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