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The Goods

Toronto Fashion Week

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How to wear (and not wear) the seven biggest fall trends from Toronto Fashion Week’s runways

NEW INTRO

(Images: George Pimentel)

Now that Toronto Fashion Week is over, it’s time to look back at the runway presentations and evaluate all the finery. From dozens of shows and hundreds of dramatic looks, we identified seven extremely wearable trends—including fuzzy accents, moss tones and high necklines—that we’re confident will be wildly popular come fall. Of course, some interpretations were more successful than others (there’s a fine line, for instance, between a chicly fluffy vest and a muppet costume). Here, the best and worst looks of the season.

The Goods

Street Style

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Street Style: the 12 best off-the-runway looks at Toronto Fashion Week

Street Style: the best looks spotted outside the tents at Toronto Fashion Week

(Image: Jenna Marie Wakani)

While we spotted some ensembles outside the Toronto Fashion Week tents that were slightly over-the-top, other outfits wowed us with their thoughtfully edited, one-of-a-kind style. Our favourite looks were all about the details: quirky manicures, statement shoes and handfuls of amazing hats. Here, the best outfits we spotted at David Pecaut Square.

The Goods

Street Style

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Street Style: Fashion Week attendees tell us about their favourite style finds

(Images: Jenna Marie Wakani)

Putting together the perfect Fashion Week outfit takes serious thought, especially if your closet doesn’t happen to be brimming with designer names or haute couture. If there’s one thing we noticed at the tents this season, it’s that you don’t need to dress in head-to-toe Helmut Lang to pull off an ultra-chic look. We asked a few creative show-goers to tell us about their favourite pieces, and discovered that—with a few runway-ready exceptions—most of the best ensembles consisted of thrift store finds, Joe Fresh T-shirts and hand-me-downs from mom. Here, some of the coolest clothing stories from Fashion Week.

The Goods

Street Style

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Street Style: Fashion Week showboaters share their strategies for standing out

street-style-toronto-fashion-week-showboaters

(Images: Jenna Marie Wakani)

Toronto Fashion Week is a magnet for sartorial exhibitionists—look-at-me attendees who steal the show (outside the tents, at least) with their “more is more” style philosophy. On Tuesday, we asked some of the most outlandishly dressed show-goers to share their tips for standing out in a well-dressed crowd. The answer? Kaleidoscopic colours, bedazzled accessories and—most importantly—a boatload of confidence. Here, fourteen looks that prove peacocking street style is alive and well in Toronto.

The Goods

Street Style

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Street Style: veteran show-goers share their Fashion Week survival essentials

(Images: Jenna Marie Wakani)

Toronto Fashion Week started off strong yesterday, with runway presentations from hot tickets Pink Tartan, Sid Neigum and Mikhael Kale. The kick-off attracted plenty of veteran show-goers (people like buyers, bloggers and editors who attend season after season) intent on scoping out the best looks for next fall. We spotted more than a few high-powered industry insiders hanging out in David Pecaut Square—some of whom have attended the event since its inception—and asked them to tell us what exactly they haul around in their sleek clutches, handbags and totes. Here, the city’s stylish elite share their essentials for surviving Fashion Week (hint: they can’t live without their iPhones).

The Goods

Shopping

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The Find: 14 items from the spring One of a Kind Show to get you geared up for (finally!) warmer weather

The Find: Ten items from the spring One of a Kind Show that will get you excited for warmer weather

(Images: One of a Kind Show)

The One of a Kind Show kicks off its spring edition this week, bringing together hundreds of Canada’s most talented makers for a gigantic shopping fest. This season, the show is full of all kinds of summery goods—colourful ceramics, breezy linen clothing and campfire-scented candles—for getting warm weather–ready. It’s always a jam-packed event (there’ll be over 450 vendors this year), so we’ve chosen some items you won’t want to skip over, including a brand new clothing line from Hoi Bo, chic backpacks from College workshop Opelle and cutely packaged, artisanal ghee. Here are 14 of our favourite things from One of a Kind’s spring show:

Mar. 25–29. $12 online. Direct Energy Centre, 100 Princes’ Blvd. oneofakindshow.com

The Goods

Stores

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Consonant Skincare comes to the PATH

(Image: Holly Blair)

(Image: Holly Blair)

Consonant Skincare, the all-natural skincare destination that’s beloved by beauty editors and loyal uptown customers, has just opened a second Toronto location. The new store, in the PATH at Bay and Adelaide, is aimed at health-conscious Torontonians who like their face wash how they like their kale (organic). The brand sells luxurious products like clay exfoliating bars, firming eye cream and an “antioxidant superhero serum”—all of which are Canadian-produced and totally free of things like parabens, sulphates and petroleum. Though the new shop won’t provide any cold-laser facials (the Yonge and Eglinton flagship offers up services from The Freeze Clinic), it will give express consultations to stressed-out suits in need of some epidermal TLC. This week, anyone who visits the store can register for a chance to win free skincare for a year, which—when you consider that a small bottle of the label’s facial serum sells for $63—would be pretty sweet.

120 Adelaide St., Unit R12, consonantskincare.com

The Goods

Stores

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Store Guide: Old Faithful Shop, the Vancouver general store’s new Queen West outpost

(Images: Jenna Marie Wakani)

(Images: Jenna Marie Wakani)

Name: Old Faithful Shop
Sells: Household goods, apothecary products, books
Contact info: 886 Queen St. W., oldfaithfulshop.com
Hours: M-Th 10-6, Fr-Sa 10-7, Su 11-6

Vancouver’s Old Faithful Shop has just opened a Toronto outpost on Queen West. Walter Manning, who co-founded the store’s west coast location in 2010, draws inspiration from his grandparents’ convenience store in Newfoundland. “I thought it was cool that people would come into their store for a potato or can of beans, but they’d return for that sense of community. To me, that was missing from retail,” he says.

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The Goods

Shopping

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Pop-Up Pick: Frank and Oak is hosting a massive warehouse sale

(Images: Jenna Marie Wakani)

(Images: Jenna Marie Wakani)

Montreal-based online menswear retailer turned concept shop creator Frank and Oak is hosting a Toronto warehouse sale this week. Known for its monthly collections of stylish basics, the label will be selling its previous collections at 50 to 70 per cent off. This is exciting stuff for local guys, who can look forward to bagging the kind of classic apparel that has sartorial longevity (think plaid button-downs, puffy vests and knit sweaters). Though there won’t be the usual haute coffee shop or hipster barber on site, shoppers will be able to get their hands on a ton of cheaply priced product, including $15 T-shirts, $30 denim, $50 blazers and $50 footwear. It’ll also be a great opportunity for anyone getting the jump on summer to stock up on $25 shorts and swim trunks. An added bonus? Credit and debit will both be accepted, so you won’t have to bring along a pile of cash.

Mar. 18-22. 21 Booth Ave., Suite 100, facebook.com

The Goods

Homes

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Inner Sanctum: a converted church condo in Little Italy worth a seven-year wait

Inner Sanctum: The former Baptist sanctuary in Little Italy has been converted into mammoth, light-soaked condos

The red brick Romanesque Revival at College and Palmerston has lived a few lives in its 126 years. In the early days of the city it was a Baptist church. By the mid-20th century it was serving Portuguese Seventh Day Adventists. Finally, in 2006, the dwindling congregation sold up to a group of investors, led by the developer Matthew Kosoy, so it could be turned into luxury condos. One of the investors, Joel Prussky, a capital markets trader at BMO, came in with his eye on a smaller unit—the former rectory, a mere 5,500 square feet spread over three storeys. He liked the idea of preserving a piece of the city’s history and thought it would be a fun investment. But it would be seven years before the space was habitable—the building’s heritage designation slowed development. In the interim, Prussky met and fell in love with his wife, Janice Nathanson, had a daughter, Kate, bought a house in Casa Loma and raised an Aussiedoodle named Coco. As construction rolled along, the family got excited about the idea of moving downtown and having Kensington’s shops and College’s restaurant row at their doorstep. To prepare for move-in, Prussky and Nathanson worked closely with two interior designers, Mazen El-Abdullah and Lisa Lev, to finish the space to their tastes. They added a gracious central staircase, a roof deck with 360-degree views of the city and an elevator to bypass the long hike (they have wet bars on every floor for the same reason). In 2013, they finally moved in, and they’ve been loving it ever since.

The Goods

Shopping

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The Find: a sultry suede dress for showing off your inner 1970s songstress

(Image: Hudson's Bay)

(Image: Hudson’s Bay)

Hudson’s Bay has just launched a new clothing line with its American counterpart, Lord and Taylor. It’s called Design Lab Lord and Taylor, and its inaugural collection for spring is packed with perfectly on-trend pieces like leather mules, printed rompers and fringed kimonos—all of which are priced under $100. Our favourite item is this canyon-red faux-suede dress, which exudes a carefree Woodstock vibe. Come summer, it’ll be an easy, no-fuss number to throw on with white sneakers. Until then, feel free to channel Stevie Nicks by pairing it with an oversized denim jacket, cowboy boots and a bowler hat. $98

Available at Hudson’s Bay locations, or online

The Goods

Stores

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Philip Sparks is closing his Ossington shop on Saturday, and then heading west

(Image: Daniel Neuhaus)

(Image: Daniel Neuhaus)

This Saturday, March 14 is your last chance to shop at local designer Philip Sparks’s quaint off-Ossington outlet. The label, which has sold retro-inspired womenswear, menswear and accessories to discerning Torontonians for the past eight years, is packing up and moving westward, merging its retail store with the designer’s existing Junction workshop at 130 Cawthra Avenue. When it opens to the public on March 21, the new, larger space will focus on tailored suiting for guys—both completely customized ensembles (which start at $2,000) and ready-to-wear blazers, shirts and trousers. It’ll also carry luxe leather goods, seasonal outerwear and on-trend accessories like skinny ties and patterned pocket squares. Says Sparks about his new concept: “Shoppers don’t just want to know about the process behind the design and construction of their suit, they want to experience it first-hand.” From now until Saturday, customers will still be able to score some serious deals at the Ossington shop, where pretty much everything, including sturdy denim jackets and duffel bags, is up to 80 per cent off.

The Goods

Street Style

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Street Style: Toronto’s dapper doormen share tips on staying warm (and all the gossip they’re allowed to dish)

(Images: Jenna Marie Wakani)

(Images: Jenna Marie Wakani)

The city’s fanciest hotels and shopping destinations—places like the Ritz-Carlton and Holt Renfrew—rely on sharp-looking doormen to do more than just guard their entrances. The genial gatekeepers bear silent witness to a ton of covert activities, including those of visiting celebs. We visited a few of the city’s best-dressed doormen—decked out for freezing temps in elegant coats and fur caps—and asked them how they stay sane in the winter (hint: layers, heaters and hot chocolate all play a role), and if they could share their craziest on-the-job stories (hint: they can only say so much). Here, seven of the city’s most delightful doormen.

The Goods

Culture

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Cabbin’ Fever: A guide to the city’s best vehicles for hire

Click to see a larger version. (Image: Michael Byers)

Click to see a larger version. (Image: Michael Byers)

Nobody owns a car anymore. Well, okay, some people own cars, but they’re an endangered bunch, at least south of Bloor. As millennials snatch up condos in the core at a staggering rate (downtown’s population has grown by 20 per cent in the last 10 years), the rite of auto ownership, once a milestone commensurate with getting hitched or having kids, has slipped right off the priority list. When walking’s not an option, urban families are availing themselves of Uber rides, car-share subscriptions and other swipe-and-go services that make sense in a city where it’s sometimes tricky to move your arms, let alone parallel park an SUV. In fact, last spring, a new build on University Avenue became Toronto’s first parking-free condo building. In place of a sprawling concrete crypt, it has a handful of dedicated car-share slips—a fact that didn’t prevent 85 per cent of the units from selling out in nine days. The latest A-to-B options make going carless cheaper and easier than ever—provided you know when and how to use them. Here, a guide to the perfect ride for every type of traveller.

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The Goods

Stores

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A store devoted entirely to Mongolian-made cashmere arrives on the Mink Mile

(Image: Daniel Neuhaus)

(Image: Daniel Neuhaus)

Black Goat Cashmere, the maker of luxurious casualwear, has just opened up its first Toronto shop on Bloor Street West, between international heavyweights Cartier and Agent Provocateur. It’s the Vancouver-based company’s first store outside of its home town, which is why most Torontonians probably haven’t heard of the Real Housewives–certified shopping destination, or its dedication to all things cashmere-related. Now, Yorkville residents and local shoppers can get their hands on Mongolian-made cashmere sweaters, dresses, pants, ponchos, scarves, turtlenecks, and even something called a “leisure suit” that will run fancy television-watchers over $600. At least for those prices, shoppers can trust that their purchases will keep them enveloped in a warm, cozy cocoon—kind of a treat on the Mink Mile, where down the road at Gucci a similar price tag will only score you a pair of painful-looking stilettos.

131 Bloor St. W., 416-967-4628, blackgoatcashmere.com