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The Goods

Homes

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The Passion Project: an extreme Rosedale reno inspired by an out-of-control art collection

great-spaces-the-passion-project-rosedale-reno-art-collection_illustrationCheryl Atkinson and Don Schmitt were running out of wall space; they’d been collecting artwork for years, and their Trinity Bellwoods semi was starting to look more like a storeroom than a sanctuary. Both practising architects, they were also itching to design their own home—a bright, contemporary space they could share with their cats, Smudge and Eldridge, and their 25-year-old son, Sam, a Concordia fine arts grad who’d recently moved back home. In the spring of 2013, they happened upon the perfect blank slate: a run-down Victorian in Rosedale with a red-brick façade and three sprawling storeys. It needed work—the building had been duplexed, and the interiors were gloomy and outdated—but the couple tackled the reno with relish. They opened up the back of the house, turning five cramped rooms into a soaring, light-filled atrium; carved out airy workspaces for themselves and Sam on the second and third floors; and, as a centrepiece, installed a twisting snow-white staircase that melts into the surrounding walls. Now there’s sufficient room to showcase all their graphic prints, intricate sculptures and prismatic oil paintings (including a few Sam Schmitt originals). The space is barely recognizable, except for the dining room, which they left almost untouched—a wood-panelled ode to the home’s 125-year history.

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The Goods

Best of Toronto

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Best of the City 2015: this year’s guide to all things excellent

Best of the City

Toronto’s appetite for material delights has never been so voracious. Suddenly, we’re snacking on $35 tins of Spanish cockles, checking our pets into four-star resorts and hiring TSO superstars to serenade us in our sitting rooms. We’ve got a million ways to spend our time and cash—which is great, but also stressful for those of us susceptible to FOMO. Our team of expert testers spent weeks plumbing the city’s nichiest of niches, unearthing new options for dining, drinking, shopping and other hedonistic pursuits. Here, your indispensable guide to the best of absolutely everything in 2015.

The Goods

Health and Beauty

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Weird Science: Hollywood-tested wellness treatments—and where to get them in Toronto

Magnetic therapyMAGNETIC THERAPY
Electromagnetic frequencies are pulsed through the body to treat pain, anxiety and even bad moods.
The Science Says: It’s a legit treatment for depression, injury and post-operative pain and swelling.
Who Does It: Suzanne Somers, NASA astronauts.
Who To Call: Bob Berman, the energy healer at Soul 7 clinic in Yorkville. $99–$200 per session. 17 Yorkville Ave., 416-847-6999.

Vampire faceliftsVAMPIRE FACELIFTS
Clients’ faces are injected with “platelet-rich plasma” (PRP), a colourless goo harvested from their own blood. Proponents say it smooths skin and plumps complexions.
The Science Says: It’s early days, but PRP may spur collagen production.
Who Does It: Kim Kardashian, Bar Refaeli.
Who To Call: The Visage Clinic. $1,600 per treatment. 179 John St., 416-929-9800.

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The Goods

Stores

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Find colourful clothing and artwork at Nuvango’s new Queen West concept shop

Nuvango

(Image: Nuvango/Facebook)

Nuvango got its start selling art-covered iPod cases (a.k.a. gelaskins) 10 years ago, and since then it’s evolved into an urban hub, supporting artists by turning their work into funky, wearable products (so far, it’s paid out over $2.5 million in royalties). Earlier this month, the organization opened a gallery-like flagship on Queen West. Upstairs is an  exhibition space, currently filled with works by local artists (prices range from $1,000 to $15,000), while the retail store downstairs sells colourful clothing and housewares (on this level, most items clock in at around $50). “We’ve always been art first,” explains marketing and communications director Dawn Laing. “But as a two-tier retail and gallery system, we’re able to bring more pieces to more people.” The company works with artists from around the world, but each in-store item is produced at its Junction studio. Bold tanks, T-shirts, leggings and throw pillows showcase a mix of cool graphic patterns and whimsical illustrations (plus this slightly terrifying pixelated wolf). For those who can’t shell out a few grand for original pieces, there are plenty of affordable framed prints, too—and with designs that range from minimalist cubes to fantastical landscapes, they’re sure to complete any Pinterest-inspired wall.

639 Queen St. W., 416-955-7986, nuvango.com

The Goods

Shopping

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The Find: twelve flattering sun hats for staying fashionably cool this summer

the-find-twelve-flattering-sunhats
Toronto’s winters may be ruled by the toque, but summer’s headwear options are far more exciting.  (That said, they don’t have to be this extravagant.) This season, it’s all about the bowler, bucket and wide-brimmed varieties. Whether you want to channel a glam St. Tropez vibe or a Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas look, here are 12 sun hats to keep your head cool and your look hot. (A bonus? Hiding that humidity-induced frizz.)

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The Goods

Shopping

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Pop-Up Pick: get crazy-soft cashmere at Kit and Ace’s Muskoka shop (and then celebrate with tacos)

pop-up-pick-kit-and-ace-port-carling

(Images: Kit and Ace)

Lucky Torontonians who get to spend their summers in Muskoka have something else to be thankful for: the shopping scene up north is seriously improving, and options are no longer limited to Tommy Bahama. For summer, Vancouver-based cashmere maker Kit and Ace has set up a season-long pop-up in Port Carling in a re-vamped boathouse right on top of Frankie’s Surf Club (where shoppers can snag beach bags from Brunswick and Co.) and Grand Electric (where they can indulge in top-notch tacos and cocktails). Inside the temporary shop, cottagers will find the sort of ultra-soft T-shirts, tank tops and shorts that go perfectly with dock lounging and hammock reading. Subtle detailing, like on one of our favourite tops, means many pieces are also cottage cocktail–party appropriate. The brand displays work from local artists in every store: up north, the walls are adorned with custom hand-painted paddles from The Hunt Collective and photographs from Toronto artist Thomas van der Zaag.

Until September. Wednesday—Thursday, 12 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Friday—Saturday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5p.m. 7-2 James Bartleman Way.

The Goods

Stores

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Anice Jewellery has opened an Ossington outpost

(Image: Caroline Aksich)

(Image: Caroline Aksich)

Anice, Kensington Market’s bijou jewellery shop, has opened a second (much larger) location on Ossington. Like the original store, the new Anice is an Etsy addict’s paradise: semi-precious stones, antique beads and sundry baubles wait to be transformed into custom necklaces, bracelets and festival-ready headbands. For those who aren’t so creatively inclined, the shop’s brick walls are adorned with owner Brittany Hopkins’s unapologetically girly creations (the 28-year-old’s motto might as well be “more is more” when it comes to anything sparkly). “We’re still offering our custom on-the-spot jewellery making, but we’re honing our finer jewellery side with more precious metalwork and gemstones,” explains Hopkins, who also plans to focus more on bridal work at the west-end outpost. Apart from bridal accessories (everything from custom wedding bands to chain-mail veils), onsite gold and silver smithing will be offered, as well as private workshops where groups can learn the art of beading while sipping rosé.

102 Ossington Ave., 647-351-5526, anicejewellery.com, @AniceJewellery

The Goods

Street Style

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Street Style: city cyclists pause to pose with their two-wheeled steeds

(Images: Kayla Rocca)

(Images: Kayla Rocca)

Come summer, the city’s streets are slammed with cyclists. Whether it’s for exercise or an attempt to avoid the TTC for a whole season, most locals love to ride—especially in the west end, where a bike is practically a requirement of residency. On a Sunday morning, we spotted owners astride well-loved clunkers, shiny new pride-and-joys and quirky hand-painted rides. Regardless of what their wheels looked like, everyone had much to say about their preferred mode of transport. Here, 17 cyclists that cruise in style.

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The Goods

Stores

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Store Guide: Convey, a Queen West spot packed with seriously stylish Australian brands

(Image: Jenna Marie Wakani)

(Image: Jenna Marie Wakani)

Name: Convey
Sells: International designer labels
Contact info: 754 Queen St. W., 416-363-7676, shopconvey.com
Hours: Sunday–Monday, 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.; Tuesday–Wednesday, Saturday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Thursday–Friday, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Convey is Queen West’s latest cool-girl shopping destination. Despite being born in the ’90s, owners Jennifer Shotbolt and Daniela Figliomeni have a ton of luxury retail experience under their belts (at places like Dior and Michael Kors). After noticing a demand in Toronto for more international labels, the two trekked to Australia Fashion Week to suss out new labels that fit their aesthetic: trendy without trying too hard. If the store’s name seems abstract, it’s on purpose (as is the bare mannequin in the window). “It’s a nod to fashion as an outlet for expression,” explains Figliomeni. “What message do you want to convey?”

The majority of the labels in the store are from Down Under—and aside from one exception, this is the only place in Toronto you’ll be able to find them. The mix of clothes—cut-out dresses, minimalist outerwear, comfy athleisure gear—is super-chic without being intimidatingly fashion-forward. Items like metallic loafers or pleated leather skirts rely on subtle detailing to elevate everyday looks. “It’s important to us to play on contradictions,” says Figliomeni. “Especially between masculine and feminine.” One of our favourite designers in the boutique who does just that is Man Repeller—approved Georgia Alice, who showcases floaty crop tops alongside tomboyish denim robes. Though prices are pretty steep, shoppers can still pull together an outfit for under $500.

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The Goods

Health and Beauty

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Three food-free cleanses you may or may not be ready for

In the neverending quest for wellness, guzzling murky green concoctions—and nothing else—for days on end is standard practice. Luckily, the city is bursting with juice shops that’ll cater to your cleansing needs, whether it’s a quick detox or full-body reset. For first-timers, protein-packed almond milks can make the journey less painful, while healing burdock root blends may appeal more to seasoned vets. Here, three of the city’s best programs, from least to most intense.

For Newbies
Greenhouse Juice Co.
5 Macpherson Ave., 416-546-1719
The Rosedale boutique calls its gentlest program the “boyfriend cleanse”—the one- to three-day diet features enough protein-packed almond milks (one of them spiked with energy-boosting maca) to keep a grown man from feeling woozy. Other components include chia-seed water, liquefied lettuce and murky green shots of E3 Live.

Cost: $69 per day for three juices, two milks, two waters and an E3 shot.

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The Goods

Shopping

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Pop-Up Pick: shop 60 local brands under one roof at Toronto Urban Collective’s summer market

pop-up-pick-toronto-urban-collectives-summer-market

Appreciating the city’s shopping scene is easy when you’re strolling along Queen West—but it’s even easier when all of the best local vendors are packed under one roof. This weekend, over 60 Toronto-based artisans, artists, designers and crafters are coming together for Toronto Urban Collective’s summer market. Of course, there’s the requisite roster of twee Etsy-inspired booths, but what separates the day-long pop-up from similar shopping events is the selection of seriously cool brands. A few of our favourites include Bailey Nelson’s hip, affordable shades, Graydon’s all-natural skincare and Uppdoo’s aztec print–adorned leather handbags. Swell and Co’s organic cotton tote makes for a playful summer purchase, and this framed duo is the perfect gift for carb-lovers. DJs will be spinning all day, and snacks and cold-pressed juice will also be available. Plus, there’ll be a cash bar for those who need a more potent pick-me-up, but tipsy shoppers beware: this is an actual item up for grabs.

$5–$7 at the door. Sunday, July 19, 11 a.m.–5 p.m. 99 Sudbury, 416-533-6066, urbancollectiveto.com

The Goods

Stores

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The Detox Market has opened an outlet in Yorkville

(Image: Daniel Neuhaus)

(Image: Daniel Neuhaus)

After three years of being King West’s all-natural beauty mecca, The Detox Market has opened a second Toronto location in Yorkville. Like its downtown counterpart, the Scollard Street store is chock full of the best clean skincare and makeup brands. (The company’s co-founder is a breast cancer survivor, so the store takes toxic ingredients seriously—you won’t find any inside.) Popular finds include the California-based company’s organic skincare line, Odacité, which harnesses the age-defying power of ingredients like raw pomegranate and papaya, plus local label Province Apothecary’s clarifying mud masks and nourishing Ilia lipsticks. Wellness products are also available, and shoppers can stock up on The Teatox Company’s herbal blends (one of our favourite new drinkable remedies) or jars of soup mix from Local Soup Girl. As of now, Greenhouse Juice goods are only available at the King Street location, but the new outlet promises some exciting DIY workshops.

96 Scollard St., 647-352-7272, thedetoxmarket.ca

The Goods

Health and Beauty

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Swallow Your Bliss: five fortifying teas, soups and sippable supplements

In a city suddenly obsessed with wellness, age-old pick-me-ups are making a stylish comeback. Ancient remedies in pretty new packaging—bone broth from The Healthy Butcher or Pekoe’s home-brewed kombucha, for instance—are being hailed for their innate healing properties, while vitamin-enriched elixirs are the new secret to endless energy. Above, the best drinkable cures for sipping your way to mind-and-body bliss.

The Goods

Stores

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Aussie skin care brand Aēsop arrives on Queen West

(Image: Daniel Neuhaus)

(Image: Daniel Neuhaus)

Queen West has a new sweet-smelling addition: Aēsop, a 28-year-old Australian skin care brand, has opened its first Canadian flagship just west of Trinity Bellwoods. The store resembles Aēsop locations around the world, so it’s slickly minimalist but still in keeping with the character of the building and neighbourhood. Here, this translates to exposed brick, and blackened steel accents that are a nod to both the area’s industrial history and the streetcar tracks out front (a look that was achieved with the help of local architecture firm superkül). Shoppers will find an array of brown bottles both big and tiny, filled with botanical ingredients like parsley seed, geranium leaf and grapefruit extract. Gentle, oil-based facial cleansers and chamomile masks are particularly popular among the sensitively skinned. Price-wise, though, be prepared to shell out: if you think spending $300 on an eye cream is ridiculous, stay far away, because there’s something about the chic design and herbal notes in the air that make it difficult to leave empty-handed.

Monday—Sunday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., 880 Queen St. W., 416-532-9623, aesop.com

The Goods

People

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Ten things Anthony Rose can’t live without

The unstoppable Toronto chef (of Rose and Sons, Big Crow and Fat Pasha fame) has a new restaurant opening this month on Queen West. Here, the 10 things he can’t live without

the-list-anthony-rose
1
My sugar fix
I try to follow a paleo diet—that means very little dairy, gluten or sugar. But I make an exception for dark chocolate from Soma. I like to dip it in peanut butter.

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