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Fall in love with BruceGreySimcoe…

bgs-top-img
 

Hike a trail, cycle a back road, take a waterfalls tour or bundle up and take a beach stroll along a wavy shore. Tis the season of fall fairs and festivals and the biggest agricultural fair of all — the International Plowing Match, September 16th to 20th in Ivy. Farmers’ markets and farm stores in BruceGreySimcoe are bursting with the season’s bounty — celebrate the harvest in a BIG way at Port Elgin Pumpkinfest, October 4th and 5th, or be part of the harvesting crew at a local winery. Start a new family tradition at Sainte–Marie among the Hurons’ annual Thanksgiving Harvest Festival.

This is apple country – drive, cycle or hike the delicious Apple Pie Trail and celebratebgs-fishing the apple season at the Apple Harvest Festival. Many orchards have their own stores so they can sell pretty much fresh from the tree to you, and at some, you can even pick your own. Tour quiet rural roads by car or motorcycle and tickle your taste buds by travelling the scrumptious Huronia Food Trail.

Avid fishermen can drop a line in Lake Simcoe, Georgian Bay, Lake Huron or one of our many inland lakes and rivers. Fall is migration time for the salmon and from mid–September to mid–October the Owen Sound Salmon Tour shadows the salmon on their annual trip up the Sydenham River.

Music lovers can take in live concerts at Casino Rama or local music festivals such as the Orillia Jazz Festival, a three–day festival from Oct 17th to 19th. Elegant and rarely seen automobiles are the star attraction at the Cobble Beach Concours d’Elegance, September 13th and 14th.

Looking for a fall escape? BruceGreySimcoe’s resorts offer fall getaway packages for families, couples and spa weekends. Fern Resort is known for its traditional family resort experience while Blue Mountain specializes in on-site activities, attractions and shopping. Rent a cottage, chalet, stay at a B&B or motel or enjoy the amenities at one of our many hotels.

Studio tours and art galleries, fall driving tours, golf, dining, shopping, museums, attractions and a warm welcome is waiting for you this fall, in BruceGreySimcoe!

 

 

  • FARMERS' MARKETS

    FARMERS’ MARKETS

    Savour the flavour of the fall harvest at our farmers’ markets and farm stores, and taste the delicious bounty of the season.

  • OWEN SOUND SALMON TOUR

    OWEN SOUND SALMON TOUR

    From mid-September to mid–October, follow the salmon’s fall migration from the harbour through the downtown core, to the Tom Thomson Art Gallery and the Owen Sound Farmer’s Market, then on to the fish ladder.

  • PUMPKINFEST

    PUMPKINFEST

    On October 4th & 5th, enjoy family fun second to none in Port Elgin – giant pumpkin weigh off, classic car show, culinary pavilion, kiddie carnival, arts & crafts & more…

  • SCANDINAVE SPA BLUE MOUNTAIN

    SCANDINAVE SPA BLUE MOUNTAIN

    Take a break and immerse yourself in the spa’s natural, tranquil surroundings and soothing atmosphere as you soak in the warm baths, have a much “kneaded” massage and just breathe.

  • THANKSGIVING HARVEST FESTIVAL

    THANKSGIVING HARVEST FESTIVAL

    Celebrate Thanksgiving with a heritage twist! Decorate a pumpkin, sample historic foods, take in an arts and crafts show and enjoy historic demonstrations at the historic site of Sainte-Marie among the Hurons in Midland.

  • Turkey spinach meatballs

    WATERFALL TOUR

    Fall colours and crisp fresh air are just bonus features on the self–guided waterfall tour, winding through scenic Grey County. Be sure to visit all nine of them!

This is a sponsored post, which means it was paid for by our advertising partners. Learn more about BruceGreySimcoe at brucegreysimcoe.com.
 
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BruceGreySimcoe – Always the Perfect Drive

 

The Informer

Sports

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Ten things Jermain Defoe can’t live without

As the new face of Toronto FC, the English striker is leading the club’s drive for its first-ever playoff spot. Here, the 10 things he can’t live without

Ten things Jermain Defoe can't live without

1 | My Bible
I always have one with me. I grew up in a Catholic home, and my family taught me to have faith.

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TIFF 2014

TIFF Guide

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TIFF 2014 Insider’s Guide: Where to Eat, Drink and Party

A highly discerning look at the festival’s hottest hot spots

TIFF 2014: Where to Eat, Drink and Party

The Chase (Image: Dave Gillespie)

Where everything sparkles

The Chase
10 Temperance St., 647-348-7000
The glitzy surf-and-turf room on Temperance Street serves up expense account dining at its finest. Last year, at the after-party for Enemy, Jake Gyllenhaal and Alyssa Miller were holed up in a booth with a view on the fifth-floor terrace, and Isabella Rossellini hung out nearby, laughing with friends, while director Denis Villeneuve schmoozed with Dallas Buyers Club director (and fellow French Canadian) Jean-Marc Vallée.

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TIFF 2014

TIFF Guide

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TIFF 2014 Insider’s Guide: Where to Get Pampered

The best salons, spas and gyms the city has to offer

TIFF 2014: Where to Get Pampered

Stillwater Spa at the Park Hyatt (Image: courtesy of Park Hyatt)

WHERE TO GET A ONCE-OVER

Stillwater Spa at the Park Hyatt
4 Avenue Rd., 416-926-2389
The Park Hyatt isn’t the city’s newest or shiniest hotel, but its spa is one of the best. It’s also one of the most obliging: in response to a VIP request during last year’s fest, staff arranged for an off-menu oxygenating facial and even brought in tanks to pump more O2 into the treatment room. This year’s TIFF package delivers a detoxifying wrap, a smoothing facial and a mask ($513).

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TIFF 2014

TIFF Guide

1 Comment

TIFF 2014 Insider’s Guide: Where to Go All Out

Over-the-top services that help you do TIFF the way it was meant to be done

TIFF 2014: Where to Go All Out

The Four Seasons

where to live large

The Four Seasons
60 Yorkville Ave., 416-964-0411
The two-year-old hotel is the city’s swankiest spot for a luxury staycation, with iPads in every room, flat-screen TVs embedded in the bathroom mirrors and incredibly attentive staff—they’ve been known to make late-night lingerie runs for visiting starlets. It’s also a prime spot for celebrity gawkery: last year, we saw Paul Haggis partying with Norman Jewison at George Christy’s annual luncheon.

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The Dish

Sponsored Content

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Victory at Maple Leaf Gardens, and Beyond

loblaws-top-lasagna

 

Champions have returned to Church and Carlton, once again. In the kitchens of Loblaw’s Maple Leaf Garden’s banner store, executive chef Mark Russell has created restaurant–quality take-home dishes that are garnering international accolades. This spring, after the International Taste & Quality Institute judging panel of chefs, sommeliers and culinary experts awarded the company a Superior Taste Award.

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The Dish

Restaurants

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Chef’s Choice: Gihen Zitouni of TOCA picks her favourite restaurants

Chef's Choice: Gihen Zitouni of TOCA picks her favourite restaurants

Who better to guide a fantasy food tour than a chef? We asked some of the city’s top culinary talents to walk us through their ideal day in Toronto restaurant meals.

Gihen Zitouni
Toca

BREAKFAST
“I’m amazed by the daily menu from Morning Glory in Corktown. I usually go for the zucchini and cheddar omelette with multi-grain bread.” 457 King St. E., 416-703-4728.

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The Dish

New Reviews

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Review: The Forth brings King West style to the souvlaki strip

(Image: Jackie Pal)

(Image: Jackie Pal)

SEE ALL NEW REVIEWS
The Forth 2 star
629 Danforth Ave., 416-465-2629
The Forth 2 star
629 Danforth Ave., 416-465-2629

Former Brassaii chef Chris Kalisperas has opened a sexy supper club on the souvlaki strip, in a cavernous warehouse space with a smiling hostess gatekeeping the ground floor. The tight, ambitious Canadian menu has that King West feel, too: there’s cured steelhead trout cubes, citrus and roe strung like jewels on the plate; crispy dry-aged duck zinged with Quebec haksap berries and sweet heirloom carrots; and roasted octopus on a grits-like bed of smooth popcorn purée. Even meat and potatoes get a smart spin: a 60 day–aged Ontario strip loin is nearly overshadowed by a quirky croquette of soft shin meat wrapped in potato shreds.

The Dish

New Reviews

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Review: The Good Son has some impressive plates (and cheaper pizza than Terroni)

(Image: Gizelle Lau)

(Image: Gizelle Lau)

SEE ALL NEW REVIEWS
The Good Son 1 star½
1096 Queen St. W., 416-551-0589
The Good Son 1 star½
1096 Queen St. W., 416-551-0589

The old Nyood space on Queen has been stripped naked and given the twee trappings of west-side dining: Edison bulbs, tea-towel napkins, even a precious general-store façade selling the house olive oil. The menu, from Top Chef Canada alum Vittorio Colacitti, has a few bumps, like a cumin-heavy eggplant dip that’s as lumpy as Pablum. But he shines at the kinds of refined dishes he made at Didier and Lucien.

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The Informer

People

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The List: Ziya Tong, host of Discovery Canada’s Daily Planet, tells us the 10 things she can’t live without

The List: Ten things Ziya Tong can’t live without

1 | My focusing bell
I keep it at the top of my stairwell. Every morning, I ring it and think of a word, like laughter, courage or radiance, to meditate on throughout the day. The ritual helps me pay attention to little things I might otherwise overlook.

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The Dish

Drinks

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Six ways with smoothies, from the Big Carrot’s blending expert

Sarah Dobec, the liquid breakfast queen at the Big Carrot’s juice bar, whizzes up delectable recipes you’d never guess were good for you

Six ways with smoothies, from the Big Carrot's Sarah Dobec

1 | Key Lime Pie (pictured)
Blend ½ an avocado, ¼-cup full-fat coconut milk, 6 ice cubes, 2 tbsp lime juice, zest of ½ a lime, 1 tbsp honey and 2 tbsp vanilla whey protein.

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The Dish

Sponsored Content

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Bring your appetite. Not your wallet.

PayPal’s mobile app is the easiest way to pay for your patio night out.

Torontonians know how to make the most of summer. As soon as the temperature rises above freezing, we’re out on restaurant patios, sipping drinks until the last ray of sunlight dims. Every minute of outdoor enjoyment is precious in this city–far too precious to spend waiting for the bill after a meal.

And that’s why PayPal’s mobile app is as essential to the season as a good pair of sunglasses or a bottle of SPF 30.

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The Dish

New Reviews

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Review: Pain Perdu nails the bistro basics

Introducing: Pain Perdu, a traditional French bistro in Lawrence Park
SEE ALL NEW REVIEWS
Pain Perdu 2 star
3185 Yonge St., 416-488-0081
Pain Perdu 2 star
3185 Yonge St., 416-488-0081

At his new north-end restaurant, a ­spin­off of the beloved Pain Perdu bakery, chef Evaristo De Andrade sticks to tradition and nails the bistro basics: moderately priced, simple French food in a warm setting. Buttery squid ink risotto is served with smoky grilled rings of tender calamari. Savoury French onion soup has deep layers of flavour, even if the onions could use a touch more caramelization.

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The Dish

New Reviews

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Review: Ambitious menu but spotty execution at Farmer’s Daughter on Dupont

Farmer's Daughter

(Image: Caroline Aksich)

SEE ALL NEW REVIEWS
Farmer’s Daughter 1 star½
1588 Dupont St., 416-546-0626
Farmer’s Daughter 1 star½
1588 Dupont St., 416-546-0626

Darcy MacDonell, the owner of the queue-drawing Farmhouse Tavern, has opened a low-budget room across the street to catch the overflow. The menu, created by Léonie Lilla, who previously worked at Daisho, delivers artfully composed ­seafood dishes that often sound more interesting than they taste.

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The Informer

Real Estate

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What $1 million will get you in Toronto today

Want one of these ho-hum houses? You’ll need seven figures and a stiff drink

In mid-April, for the first time ever, the average selling price for a detached home in Toronto nudged, just briefly, over the million-dollar mark—a surge of 19 per cent over last year. You might argue that the number is an arbitrary data point on a line graph sloping skyward. It’s not. To hopeful house hunters, seven figures is a ­chasmic mental leap and a devastating reminder of the near impossibility of owning four unshared walls in this city. Just a few years ago, the mid- to low-$800s were territory for the excessively affluent or certifiable; today that’s considered a steal. The $900s, given a long amortization and a diet of rice and lemon water, have become tolerable, too. Welcome to the millies, the new new stratum of absurdity.

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